Remarkable

Magnetic

Some items attract and repel (not a scientific definition of magnets). Yesterday, I used aluminum foil next to the microwave while heating up oatmeal. The aluminum foil pieces sailed off the counter. I was perplexed until I realized I had created an unsustainable environment in which these two items could not co-exist.

Consider the activities that are on your ‘not a chance’ list. It might be walking over a swinging bridge, teaching preschool, entering a burning structure, voting for a policy, spending money on a luxury, or eating a local delicacy. There are activities that we are not willing to try (or the condition have not forced us to attempt them).

How might we resonate with those who see our work as essential and not seek the attention of those who are not ready to engage?

Celebrate

How often do we start or finish our conversation (and meetings) with a point of celebration? Even our problems can be high quality challenges that 99% of peer organizations in our sector would be desperate to contemplate solving. Mindset matters and our attention and work follows. Celebrate, even if it is a rainy, cold, headwind. It might make you stronger and certainly provides the foundation for a remarkable story.

It Can Wait Until the Meeting

What discussion and opportunities have you missed because they were postponed until the next meeting or there was not time on the agenda? What might have happened if the moment of creativity and insight was allowed to take flight in real-time? If all our actions are captured on a schedule, then when does ‘be remarkable’ appear in writing on our calendar? Perhaps we have the inspiration, strength, endurance, or ideal conditions to tackle the crux move today. What if we embraced the dynamic, now?

Thanks for the reminder Seth Godin.

Location

Most Saguaros cactus do not have golf balls embedded in their arms. However, those that reside within a golf course are inclined to collect a few errant shots. I have been in many conversations where a social sector cause wishes to attract a sensational feature or benefit, perhaps a billionaire philanthropist who takes interest in supporting the enterprise with untold generosity. However, if we are not in a billionaire’s mindset, then perhaps we are like a cactus in the wild trying to catch golf balls. Embrace our respective geographies, we are remarkable for existing within the landscape we occupy.

The World’s Largest, Fastest, Greatest…..

The world’s largest iceberg just formed. It is remarkable for its size (larger than the Spanish island of Mallorca). The moment it separated from the ice shelf in Antarctica, the countdown timer begins on its title defense. It will be overtaken by a bigger iceberg, divided into multiple smaller icebergs, or eventually melt. Its fate as the former largest iceberg is inevitable. 

When we try to retain a title as largest, biggest, fastest, best-funded, etc., we hang our competitive advantage on a flimsy flag pole. It might stand tall and be covered in spotlights, but our flag looks out of place, antiquated, and even irrelevant once it is surpassed. That is why some companies invest in achieving the title of ‘best place to work.’ It reflects their organizational culture and values. The best place to work is more challenging to create but sustainable when the community believes in its collective strength; it is not a finish line but an enduring journey.

Is your enterprise trying to win by metrics or invest in human experiences? The number of large retailers that were once ubiquitous and now obsolete might provide a narrative about the staying power of those who scale first.  Then there are those remarkable causes that continue to deliver on a promise that is not easy to measure but is profoundly evident in every interaction.

I

Creating Mile Markers

The mile marker we pass on the highway was not destined to reside where it sits today. Following the Romans example (who probably plagiarized from a previous culture), we decided to mark our roads with mile markers. Another round of decisions was made about which point to use as Mile Zero and then measuring and marking began.

The uniformity of mile markers works, but it is not remarkable. I cannot recall the closest mile mark to any location. What I do remember are the markers that define a place. There is a church on the sixteenth switchback of the road to Alpe d’Huez, a famous French cycling climb. There is a small evergreen tree that is missing a limb before the steepest and fastest cross-country ski descent. A full-scale replica of a military plane used on movie sets rests in a large tree on the island of Oahu, marking the start of the most challenging climb I run during a trail race.

We can create markers. Art museums engage world-renowned architects to design buildings that will define a city. Communities commit to greenways and bike lanes that make non-vehicle travel incredibly easy and enjoyable. These investments define a way of life (bike garage outside Amsterdam Centraal train station). Causes run iconic events, and participants know precisely where to find them.

What have you created that will define your location? Is it memorable, or does it blend in with the other mile markers?

Marking the Way Out

Do we mark the way to the exit for those looking to move on, or do we let them stumble around until they find it without acknowledgement? It is easy to place our energy in marking the entrance but if those who entering encounter a tired and exhausted group of individuals looking for the depart, then neither group is being served. Even the airlines post a member of the flight crew at the plane door to wish us a good onward journey. What if our exit was as remarkable as our first impressions of the cause?

Average

IMG_1219

The average person falls asleep in 7 minutes.

The average person laughs 10 times a day.

The average person walks the equivalent of twice around the world during their lifetime.

The average person has over 1,460 dreams a year.

The average shower temperature is 101 degrees.

Source: did-you-know.com

Average creates comparison.  How do I rank?  Am I above or below average?  What if we asked ourselves about the work that falls far from average?  What is it we are going that lands on the far end of the scale?  Perhaps we should be doing more.  There are plenty of people who fall within a few percentage points of average, but many remarkable individuals doing something different.