Uncategorized

Marking the Way Out

Do we mark the way to the exit for those looking to move on, or do we let them stumble around until they find it without acknowledgement? It is easy to place our energy in marking the entrance but if those who entering encounter a tired and exhausted group of individuals looking for the depart, then neither group is being served. Even the airlines post a member of the flight crew at the plane door to wish us a good onward journey. What if our exit was as remarkable as our first impressions of the cause?

Adventures that inspire others

When we share our ideas and adventures, it creates new possibilities. I had been thinking about climbing Decker Peak in Idaho’s Sawtooth Mountains for a few years. Three weeks ago, I crossed paths with two fast-moving climbers headed to the peak via a long approach. They gave me a quick synopsis of the route and then sped off. After completing that backpacking trip, I used Summitpost.org to read climber’s reviews and insights. Then I read a 2015 trip report on Idaho Alpine Zone. The trip report put together a route I had not considered and had me mapping out a new itinerary. So we returned to the mountains for a three-day backpack trip and spent nine hours on the middle day hiking to the base of the peak, ascending, and then returning to camp. Creating a route employing the knowledge of those that had tackled the climb beforehand made for an optimistic mindset. Even though we may travel alone, following the steps of those who have proceeded us changes our outlook on what is possible.

Route map of the 2015 group

Updates

When we make a mistake, are we willing to go back and make updates and acknowledge the error? Or do we move ahead and leave our audience with misinformed and unable to properly navigate? It seems like an easy choice when presented theoretically but in real-time, may find it easier to hide than to stand up and highlight their missteps.

No Title Needed (The Work is Done)

Sometimes you do not have to be the tallest, most scenic, or most beautiful to be remarkable. Sometimes you do not even have to be growing. We can perform excellent work that endures. What was once a tenacious fight to thrive in a challenging landscape now is a monument to fortitude. The work that was inspires those that travel the same route today. In real-time, we may not realize what we are building. However, what is achieved becomes the mile marker, point of conversation, and unforgettable landmark to those that follow.

People Before Buildings

Recreational Equipment Inc. (REI) is selling their brand new custom built headquarter building. They never moved in despite designing a facility that captured the essence of outdoor lifestyle and embraced nature. Rumored reasons for abandoning the HQ include, raising cash for the balance sheet, changes to workplace requirements, and pivoting to a new business model. Five years ago, REI was a leader in closing stores on Black Friday. Instead it started the #optoutside movement, encouraging people to engage in an outside activity over chasing retail sales. REI chose people over buildings.

It is easy to think that our facilities as the essence of our being. Where we do what we do defines our stories. We have been encouraged to choose our travel lodging based on the ammenties of a hotel or airbnb. Ice machine of every floor, pet friendly, workout facility with new machines, and 24-hour room service might make the difference in selecting our overnight lodging. But if the people who work within the building do not care, it cannot overcome the luxury.

If we lead with our core values then we can see how REI decided to forego their dream HQ. In the first half of 2020, they laid-off employees and closed stores. The optics of moving into the headquarters would amplified the misguided ethos of managing image over leading people. Instead, they were willing to put the moving trucks on hold and revisit their decisions. REI asked “how might we” and the resulting choice was a different path. A journey which may create more loyalty, greater trust, and a better future.

What do you do?

Is there a better question than “what do yo do?” I am not sure if the askers wants to know my response so they can categorize me or if they are waiting to share their story. Do they want to place me into one of two categories: useful or not useful? What if I answer astronaut, Banksy, or $250 million lottery winner? Would those responses disrupt their sorting process? What if we consider better questions, like those recommended on LeadershipFreak blog (also consider the bonus material at the bottom).

Some questions I entertain as follow-up questions: What borders have you recently crossed? What insight/realization changed your perspective? Who inspires you and how can I sample their message/work? What ‘help wanted’ sign would you post if you knew a response would come within the hour? What is your super power?

Perhaps the best response to “what do you do,” is to ask better follow-up questions.

Unconnected

If we are not meaningfully connected to individuals who want to hear from us, then even our most remarkable stories are lost in transmission. Daily, we delete inspired content in order to manage our inbox. Then we turn around and send out unsolicited requests for others to engage with us. We believe that if we have your contact information you might be ready to act on our behalf. What if we created a community of individuals who could signal us That they were willing to hear our stories? Consider our own habits. Which messages do we read the moment they are received? How did those senders create trust and permission to interact with you? What if we did the work that matters to create engagement with those that might want to hear from us?

Blind Corners

When our line of sight is limited, we have choices. Speed up, maintain pace, or proceed with caution. Our sense of place and mindset impact our ultimate decision. Driving on the interstate, we can expect the road is engineered to support the speed limit. So a curve should not result in radical deviation. Mountain biking down a flow trail, we can expect banked corners to accommodate the speed we might be carrying from above. In a high alpine backcountry setting we might anticipate some thoughtfulness in trail design but if the vertical exposure is sufficient, we might decide to decrease our pace.

We encounter blind corners all the time. We can not see into the future far enough to anticipate the terrain. If we previously traveled a path it is easier to approach with a sustainable pace. If the trail is new to us, we might settle for a cautionary approach, allowing us time to adjust our course.

The recent months have presented a series of blind corners. COVID, financial recessions, virtual workplaces, Black Lives Matter, and masks. Some enterprises saw a chance to accelerate into open space. Others pulled to the shoulder of the road with their hazard lights ablaze. Each organizations saw their approach as best. Blind corners tend to amplify our beliefs and values. If we see each opportunity as a challenge to maximize our talents, then we might proceed in sports mode. If we believe we are playing the infinite game, then we might downshift and cover the brakes, confident we will be able to continue to journey.

How do our choices amplify (or derail) our core values? Have we built trust and loyalty because we acted in concert with our beliefs or have we created factions in our team due to misalignment? Are we still on the road or have we spun out into the ditch?

Pacesetters

In our youth, my sister and I raced NASTAR alpine ski races whenever we found a chance. The concept was simple. A pacesetter skied the race course first and then their individual handicap created a standard by which participant’s results were adjusted and awarded medals. Theoretically, the fastest pacesetter and the slowest pacesetter should create the same par due to the handicap system. A competitive skier might beat the time of a pacesetter but be awarded a silver or bronze medal after the handicap adjustment. Somewhere there is shoe box with gold medals scattered among many silver and a few bronze (platinum was not an option in our youth).

When a pacesetter is present, the ability to measure results and progress are more immediate. If we want to run a sub-three hour marathon, we can run with a pacesetter who will set a tempo that guides us towards that goal. As such, a pacesetter can provide remarkable value. Sometimes, just the presence of an individual out in front of us on a route might inspire us to endure longer or increase our pace.

Pacesetters do not need to be formal commitments. You may be creating the pace for a group of individuals (or organizations) that you may not realize. Just going out a doing the work, being present and reliable might be sustaining an entire ecosystem of participants. Continue forward, we see you out front and keep showing-up because we know you will be there.